Fun Chicago ice rinks open

 

Work off holiday treats by ice skating. Or simply enjoy the outdoors gliding around a rink to a waltz or holiday music.  The City of Chicago, its park district and The Park at Wrigley Field have ice rinks that are fun to skate. All you need to bring are your skates or rent them there.

Skaters at the McCormick Tribune Ice Rink in Millennium Park. City of Chicago photo

Skaters at the McCormick Tribune Ice Rink in Millennium Park. City of Chicago photo

Millennium Park

McCormick Tribune Ice Rink

Look below the Bean (Cloud Gate) sculpture on the Michigan Avenue level between Washington and Madison Streets to join skaters on the McCormick Tribune Ice Rink, free of charge. Ice skate rental is $12 Monday-Thursday, $14 Friday-Sunday and holidays.

Open through March 4, 2018, the rink’s regular hours: Mondays–Thursday, noon–8 p.m., Fridays, noon–10 p.m. (ice skating lesson at 11am), Saturdays (Nov. 18–Jan. 6), 10 a.m.–10 p.m. (ice skating lesson at 9 a.m.), Saturdays (Jan. 13–Mar. 3), 10 a.m.–9 p.m. (ice skating lesson at 9 a.m.) and Sundays, 10 a.m.–9 p.m. (ice skating lesson at 9 a.m.)

Holiday hours: Christmas Eve, Dec. 24, 10 a.m.–6 p.m. (ice skating lesson at 9 a.m.), Christmas Day, Dec. 25, 10 a.m.–4 p.m. Dec. 26 – Dec. 30, 10 a.m.–10.p.m. (ice skating lesson at 9 a.m.), New Year’s Eve, Dec. 31, 10.a.m.–8.p.m. (ice skating lesson at 9 a.m.), New Year’s Day, Jan. 1, 10 a.m.–10 p.m.

Maggie Daley Park Skating Ribbon

Look on north side of Millennium Park at 337 E. Randolph St. to find the Maggie Daley Park Skating Ribbon. It really curves like a ribbon. Admission is free. Skate rental and regular hours are the same as McCormick Ice Rink except Sundays 10 a.m. to 8 p.m.

Holiday Hours: Christmas Eve, Dec. 24, 10 a.m. – 6 p.m., Christmas Day, Dec.25, 10 a.m. – 9 p.m., New Year’s Eve, Dec.31, 10 a.m. – 8 p.m., New Year’s Day, Jan. 1, 10 a.m. – 9 p.m. (During the holiday break, the Skating Ribbon will be open from 10:00 am – 10:00 pm, except for above dates).

 

Wrigley Field

The Rink at the Park

Skate in The Park at Wrigley, the public entertainment area that abuts Wrigley Field at 3637 N. Clark St. Opened Nov. 24, the 8,000 sq. foot ice rink will be open daily through Feb. 25, 2018. Entry is $5 ages 13 and older. Skate rental is $10.

If there during the holidays stop at the Christkindle Market that opened this year for the first time in the Park at Wrigley.

 

Chicago Park District

The park district operates several ice rinks. Its outdoor Warren Ice Rink at 6601 N. Western Ave. is already open as is the Maggie daley Skating Ribbon and the McFetridge Ice Rink which is indoors at 3843 N. California Ave.. Other rinks open in December depending on weather conditions.

Click Chicago Parks for locations and hours.

 

Catch sight of the Leonids meteorites

 

Ever since a meteorite shot overhead while on my way to a very early morning Y swim, I’ve been hooked on meteorite watching. Catching a falling star sounds romantic when it’s in a song but knowing when to watch for shooting “stars” can be exciting or even a reason to have party.

The next prominent meteor shower in 2017 is mid November when the Leonids peak after midnight between Nov. 17 and 18.

Meteor shower. (NASA photo)

Meteor shower. (NASA photo)

Where weather is not a factor, Leonids watching will be good because the moon will be in its new phase so there will be no moonlight to make them harder to see.

Of course meteorites are harder to spot in a highly lit area or where the sky glows from city lights so seek out an area near a lake, a park but for safety’s sake go in pairs.

As to where the Leonids come from, think of them as debris left from the Tempel-Tuttle comet.

You see the debris as meteorites when planet Earth’s orbit takes it through the debris. The meteor shower gets its name because they seem to come from a point in the Leo constellation.

What to expect. Look overhead but a bit towards the east. If lucky you may spot about 20 bright, fast meteorites streaking across the sky in an hour. They typically travel about 44 miles per second.

Some years have produced more but about 15 to 20 per hour is a reasonable expectation if watching after midnight when Nov. 17 has turned into Nov. 18.  I have spotted them early dawn just before sunrise in mid-November of past years. However, Earth is traveling through the Leonids most of November.

For more meteor and Leonids info check out Time and Date, Space and NASA.

 

 

 

 

Gorgeous gardens illuminate for the holidays

 

Walk among flowers, trees and interesting plants in the winter? Yes if the garden has been transformed with lights.

From the Chicago Botanic Garden and Morton Arboretum in the Chicago area to Bellingrath Gardens and Home near Mobile, AL and the Desert Botanical Garden in Phoenix, several gardens across the United States are putting on their holiday evening finery with lights and sounds to say enjoy the season no matter what the temps.

Whether you take a a “staycation” or go out of town, there’s likely to be a garden near by dressed up for the holidays.

Delightful lights and scenes are around every corner at Bellingrath Gardens outside Movile, AL. Jodie Jacobs photo

Delightful lights and scenes are around every corner at Bellingrath Gardens outside Movile, AL. Jodie Jacobs photo

 

Bellingrath

If near Mobile, AL do get tickets to explore Bellingrath Gardens and Home. The 65-acre estate of Walter and Bessie Bellingrath treats visitors to breathtaking light displays and the home is decorated for the holidays.

Called Magic Christmas in Lights, and running Nov. 24 through Dec. 31, 2017, the holiday event has  about 15 scenes, 1,100 displays and three million lights to surprise visitors around every corner and off in the distance.. Weekends feature choral groups on the home’s South Terrace.

Bellingrath Gardens and Home is at 12401 Bellingrath Gardens Rd., Theodore, AL. For tickets, hours and more information call 800) 247 8420 and visit Bellingrath Magic.

 

Chicago Botanic Gardens

In the Chicago area trees sparkle with thousands of lights outside and trains toot around city landmarks inside during the Chicago Botanic Garden’s Wonderland Express celebration, Nov. 24, 2017 through Jan. 7, 2018. BTW there is gently falling snow in the main train area and poinsettias in the greenhouses.

The Chicago Botanic Garden is at 1000 Lake Cook Rd, Glencoe. For tickets and other information call (847) 835-5440 and visit Chicago Botanic Wonderland.

 

Morton Arboretum 

Illumination at Morton Arboretum, Lisle, IL is stunning and fun. Morton Arboretum photo

Illumination at Morton Arboretum, Lisle, IL is stunning and fun. Morton Arboretum photo

Also, go over to the Morton Arboretum where colored lights spectacularly light up the grounds during Illumination Nov. 17, 2017 through Jan. 1, 2018. The lights are interactive with some lights moving to music and some trees changing color with a hug or song. A medallion will also be sold that reacts to the sights and sounds.

The Morton Arboretum is at 4100 IL Hwy, 53, Lisle. For tickets and other information call (630) 968-0074 and visit Morton Arb Illumination.

Tip: Tickets to the Botanic Garden and Morton Arboretum holiday shows need to be bought in advance because they are time and date specific and sell-out early.

 

Desert Botanical Garden

If vacationing in the Scottsdale/Phoenix area go over to the Desert Botanical Garden for Las Noches de las Luminarias, Nov. 24 through Dec. 30, 2017. Wander the paths lit by thousands of luminaria bags and twinkling lights. In addition the garden will be featuring the work of Japanese American sculptor Jun Kaneko.

The Desert Botanical Garden is at 1201 N. Galvin Parkway, Phoenix, AZ. For tickets and other information call 480-941-1225 and visit DBG Luminarias.

 

Next in the holiday series will be zoo lights but if you have a favorite holiday garden visit not mentioned here please tell us in Leave a Reply.

 

The Draconids are here whether you see them or not

 

Look up tonight, Oct. 7 and tomorrow Oct, 8 to try to catch the Draconid meteor shower.

Typically this meteor shower does not fill the sky with what some folks call “shooting stars” but some years it can be spectacular.

Meteor shower. (NASA photo)

Meteor shower. (NASA photo)

The meteors emanate from the Draco the Dragon constellation.

Sky watchers know it was fun to see in 2011 when more than 600 meteors shot out from the Dragon per hour.

Watch for them after the sun sets.

However, if clouds don’t interfere then the light from the waning gibbous moon, still about 75 percent glowing following the very recent full harvest moon, might make the meteors harder to see.

Best plan is to go somewhere without street or city lights as soon as suitably dark, then look north.

The later it is in the night when the moon is high and bright, the harder it will be to catch a “falling star.”

The Draconid meteors, also called the Giacobinids, happen when the Earth’s orbit has it colliding with debris from the comet 21 P/ Giacobini-Zinner.

The comet’s orbit is 6.5 years long so this year may be the next good year since 2011.

To learn more about the Draconids vist Earthsky.  To learn more about meteors and how to watch them visit NASA.

Good luck

 

 

 

 

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