Archive for the ‘Happenings’ Category

Be a happy Chicago Marathon spectator

It’s hard to believe the Chicago Marathon will turn 40 when thousands of runners step across the start line in Grant Park Oct. 11, 2017. I remember when a neighbor (three houses ago) helped with the planning and ran in it and his wife was a spectator for the first one in 1977. They were excited that it attracted over 4,000 runners.

Add a zero for 2017. In 2016 there were more than 40,000 runners. Visit race history for more background info.

Chicago Marathon starts and ends in Grant Park but runs through 29 Chicago neighborhoods. (Bank of America photo)

Chicago Marathon starts and ends in Grant Park but runs through 29 Chicago neighborhoods.
(Bank of America photo)

Part of the popularity lies in the course. It’s ideal for runners who like a flat terrain (say opposed to the last hill in the Boston Marathon). However, the course also has the travel-lover’s bonus of showing off 29, diverse Chicago neighborhoods filled with different residential, business and ecclesiastic architectural styles, sculptures and murals.

So, the question is where to watch the race.

General spectators won’t be able to go near the race’s start and finish areas in Grant Park on race day. These area are for participants with bib numbers, event and credentialed staff plus a few ticketed individuals. The Post-Race Party and runner reunite area of Grant Park will open to spectators at 9:30 a.m. but with heavy safety measures in place including personal and bag screening.

With an expected 1.7 million spectators, standing in a crowd near the beginning and end of the race will be tough to watch for someone or cheer that person on. Checking other course sites makes more sense.

First, here are the neighborhoods along the 26.2 mile course. Bridgeport, Bronzeville, Central Station, Chinatown, East Pilsen, (The) Gap, Greektown, Illinois Medical District, Lakeview East, Lincoln Park, Little Italy, Loop, Magnificent Mile, Near North, Near West Side, New East Side, Old Town, Old Town Triangle, Park Boulevard, Park West, Pilsen, Prairie District, River North, South Commons, South Loop, Streeterville, University Village, West Loop and West Loop Gate.

Secondly, click Spectator Guide to download a pdf that can help you decide where to go and what time you’ll want to be there.

You can drive if you stay west of the course’s street closures but Chicago’s public transportation system is excellent. The “L” is the best choice for getting around the city during the marathon because buses will be impacted by street closures.

One veteran Chicago Marathon runner recommended the Mile 14 area near the University of Illinois Chicago Campus. The Blue Line UIC-Halsted Station is near miles 13.5 to 16.5. When exiting use the Halsted Street or Morgan Street exit then walk two blocks north on Morgan Street to Adams Street (Mile 13.5). Exiting at Halsted Street gets you to Mile 16.5.

Runners are expected to reach this area from 8:27 a.m. to 1 p.m.

As to safety, Chicago Marathon officials working with the City of Chicago, added safety rules and features following the terrorist attack at the Boston Marathon. such as screening of participants,  clear plastic bags for gear checks and access only to Grant Park just for runners. Security rules only allow ticketed finish line viewing.

More meetings were held with the city following the recent horrific Las Vegas shooting.

Executive Race Director Carey Pinkowski said, ” As we enter the final week of preparations for the 40th running of the Bank of America Chicago Marathon, the horrible events that took place in Las Vegas are weighing heavily on our hearts.  We extend our deepest condolences to the victims, their families and all who have been affected by this national tragedy. We also understand how many who plan to participate in Sunday’s celebration may have some concerns about public safety in the wake of Sunday’s events. ‘

Pinkowski added, “We are constantly examining, modifying and enhancing our public safety and security plan based on input from our law enforcement partners.  This week, we will be discussing what adjustments will be made given Sunday’s tragedy.  And, on race day, we will be working alongside the Chicago Police Department and many others in the law enforcement community, as we do every year, to keep our event, our participants and our city safe.”

She re-uttered the mantra heard on TV since the shooting about seeing something, saying something. “We remind everyone on race day to report any suspicious activity to law enforcement immediately.”

Both marathon and city officials emphasize that participating in the race as runners and cheerers show is still important.

“Wwe encourage all participants to join us on Sunday for what is always an uplifting, joyous celebration of the human spirit,” said Pinkowski.

For more guide information visit Spectator.

 

See Harvest Moon on Thursday

Watch for Harvest Moon. (Jodie Jacobs photo

Watch for Harvest Moon. (Jodie Jacobs photo

If in Chicago, rain or cloudy skies may prevent you from seeing the Harvest Moon Oct. 5, but if you are elsewhere in the Northern Hemisphere you should be able to see what looks like a large, orangey-toned impressive orb. (The moon also looked impressive Chicago Oct. 4 when the weather cleared).

It’s dubbed the Harvest Moon because it is the full moon closest to the autumn equinox when farmers enjoy more moonlight to finish harvesting their crops.

That’s because even though the moon typically rises 50 minutes later each fall and winter day, the moon’s orbital path is narrower in the Northern Hemisphere near the autumn equinox. That orbit makes it rise only about 35 minutes later each day.

BTW, the orange color is noticed when seeing the moon through the Earth’s atmosphere near the horizon. The moon also looks larger from that angle.

For more info please visit Earth Sky or Almanac or Science NASA.

 

 

 

 

Save eclipse glasses for next big solar event

 

The next time a total solar eclipse crosses the United States isn’t that far off. It’s April 8, 2024

Floor map of eclipse paths at the Adler Planetarium. Jodie Jacobs photos

Floor map of eclipse paths at the Adler Planetarium. Jodie Jacobs photos

If you didn’t have a chance to experience totality on Aug. 21, 2017 you might want to plan where you want to see it next time. Even if you don’t go you might know someone who will. So save those eclipse glasses if lucky enough to have a pair.

Carbondale, IL will again be dead center when the eclipse path crosses the United States. But the path of the 2024 total solar eclipse will cut the opposite direction. It will go from Mexico in the southwest to Maine in the northeast as it moves across Texas, Arkansas, Indiana, Ohio, New York and Vermont.

Consider then, taking a spring vacation in Austin or Dallas Texas, Indianapolis, Toledo or Cleveland, Ohio or the Buffalo, Niagara Falls area or even Montreal. Chicago won’t be in the direct total solar eclipse path until Sept. 14, 2099.

To go now to walk across the map visit Adler Planetarium’s “Chasing Eclipses” exhibit. It has a terrific floor map of the total solar eclipse path for 2017, 2024 and 2099.

The Adler also has a total solar eclipse experience at one end of the exhibit complete with cooler air, expected sounds and a good visual eclipse.

 

Why experience totality

The following quote from Adler Astronomer Larry Ciupik, the Doane Observatory director,  describes what he saw in Capo San Lucas, Mexico July 1991.

“It didn’t matter how much I knew about it or prepared for it, my first total solar eclipse was unexpected and unlike anything I’ve ever seen!” Ciupik said on an Adler web site.

He went on to explain. “In the last few seconds before totality, the sky darkened to a deep blue, then purple, and faint wavering lines appeared—shadow bands—whisking across the sand of our beachside site. Suddenly, the Sun itself dramatically changed. I took off my special solar viewing filter and saw what looked like a hole in the sky surrounded by a pearlescent glow. The Sun’s outer atmosphere, the corona, resembled outstretched wings several times wider than the hole on each side.”

Also, totality will last longer on its path. It will range from three minutes plus seconds to four minutes plus seconds over most of the United States in April 2024 instead of the two minutes plus seconds it did  in August 2017.  For the 2024 path click here and at Time and Date.

The Adler Planetarium's "Chasing Eclipses" exhibit simulates a total solar eclipse that includes the cooling air and sounds. Jodie Jacobs photos

The Adler Planetarium’s “Chasing Eclipses” exhibit simulates a total solar eclipse that includes the cooling air and sounds. Jodie Jacobs photos

 

Checking locations

To figure the time of the eclipse in the city you want to visit check its latitude and longitude then go to NASA Path.

The information is thanks to NASA and Fred Espenak.  The numbers are in Universal Time so for central daylight time subtract 5 hours and eastern daylight time subtract 4 hours.

Another good resource is Earth Sky. For another map of eclipses see EarthSky Essentials.

 

Adler Exhibit

“Chasing Eclipses”is up now through through Jan. 8, 2018. The Adler Planetarium is on the Museum campus at 1300 South Lake Shore Drive Chicago, IL 60605. For ticket and other information visit Adler Planetarium and call (312) 922-7827.

 

 

 

Chicago hosts World Roller Derby where it all began

 

If you remember when you used to roller skate in the neighborhood or go to a local rink to roller skate, or if you like things retro, then mark down Aug. 19, when the World Roller Derby game will be played in south suburban Summit using 1970s rules and classic uniforms.

Joan Weston, L, of the Westerners and Cathie Read of the Bombers compete back in mid last century. Roller Derby Hall of Fame photo.

Joan Weston, L, of the Westerners and Cathie Read of the Bombers compete back in mid last century. Roller Derby Hall of Fame photo.

If you like the idea of celebrating a sport in the city where it began, then head to the former site of the Chicago Coliseum on Aug. 13

Roller Derby athletes and fans will be there to mark Chicagoan Leo Seltzer’s organizing the first Roller Derby Race where it first took place, Aug. 13, 1935.

 

Event Info

For the Aug. 13 celebration, go from 12:30 to 2 p.m. to Coliseum Park at 1513 S. Wabash Ave.

To see the retro roller derby game, a double header from 2  to 6 p.m., go to the Fleetwood Roller Rink, at 7231 W. Archer Ave. in Summit (south of Brookfield and I 55), Aug. 19.

Participants  will be wearing the classic uniforms of the Midwest Pioneers and the Chicago Westerners using the 1970s rules. There will also be a Junior Roller Derby game.

Tickets are needed and limited so contact Brown Paper Tickets, a World Roller Derby Week partner, at Time Hop.

”We want to look back at our roots, pay respect to its founding members and to the city of Chicago, to celebrate our beginnings and progress, and give back to the community through service,” said World Roller Derby Week organizer Cheryl Cryer. “The roller derby story should be shared broadly as we look to our future in our juniors, who will no doubt carry us further than we could ever imagine.” Cryer said.

The event is also partnering with the American Red Cross for a national blood drive. Donor Pledges will be available at the events.

 

Hall of Fame

Raise you hands if you knew there is a Roller Derby Hall of Fame. You can find out about the sport and who is inducted there by clicking Roller Derby.

It was housed at NYC’s  Madison Square Garden in the early 70s, closed. But the sport hasn’t disappeared. There are nearly two thousand women’s, men’s and junior leagues skating and competing.  The Hall of fame reopened in Brooklyn in the early 2000s and will be moving to southern California soon.

 

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